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  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants's book review was featured in The Egypt Game.
    In this book, six sixth-graders form their own secret society devoted to Egypt-related things. In the beginning, April moves from Hollywood to an unspecified Californian city famous for its university–her mother is busy pursuing a career as an esteemed actress. April, considered eccentric by many, makes friends with Melanie, who lives in April's grandmother's apartment; they discover their shared interest for imagining, and they invent the titular Egypt Game. Melanie's younger brother, a girl living in the apartment, and two boys from school all become involved in the Egypt game. But soon, a murder occurs, and the children are all cautioned to stay indoors–and the main suspect is the Professor, the reclusive man, in whose storage yard the Egyptians worship Egyptian Gods. Who is this strange human? And, who is the real criminal? This is a great book, full of good dialogue and realistic characters. It's witty and the writing is good too, but at times it seems a little dated, such as when the characters say "fink" and other weird words (this was written in 1967). I would recommend this book to people who like realistic fiction, as it focuses more on the friendships developing between the Egyptians than the actual mystery, though it is still important to the plot.
    20 days ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants added a book review.
    In this book, six sixth-graders form their own secret society devoted to Egypt-related things. In the beginning, April moves from Hollywood to an unspecified Californian city famous for its university–her mother is busy pursuing a career as an esteemed actress. April, considered eccentric by many, makes friends with Melanie, who lives in April's grandmother's apartment; they discover their shared interest for imagining, and they invent the titular Egypt Game. Melanie's younger brother, a girl living in the apartment, and two boys from school all become involved in the Egypt game. But soon, a murder occurs, and the children are all cautioned to stay indoors–and the main suspect is the Professor, the reclusive man, in whose storage yard the Egyptians worship Egyptian Gods. Who is this strange human? And, who is the real criminal? This is a great book, full of good dialogue and realistic characters. It's witty and the writing is good too, but at times it seems a little dated, such as when the characters say "fink" and other weird words (this was written in 1967). I would recommend this book to people who like realistic fiction, as it focuses more on the friendships developing between the Egyptians than the actual mystery, though it is still important to the plot.
    20 days ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants has read this book.
    By Zilpha Keatley Snyder
    21 days ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants's book review was featured in A Small Zombie Problem (Zombie Problems).
    In this imaginative tale set in a world resplendent with French food, swamps, and alligators, August DuPont endeavors to become a part of society. Up till now, he has been admonished by Aunt Hydrangea to stay inside, lest he be attacked by butterflies. But never could he have imagined that he would be introduced to three humans, all of his own age, while attempting to get Mud Pies. Never could he have thought that, on the next day, he would be introduced to another human, his aunt Orchid Malveu, who instructs him to find a valuable family heirloom. It is still surprising, though, when he discovers that he has summoned a zombie named Claudette from the grave. As August tries to befriend his rich cousins, all while keeping his zombie hidden, he discovers the history of the DuPont and Malveu families: specifically, their bitter rivalry over stolen hot sauce recipes, and he finds out the existence of an ancestor who practiced necromancy using the Zombie Stone, the expensive family heirloom Orchid wishes to locate. What I liked about this book about problems with zombies was its world-building. The imaginative setting where the story takes place, namely, Pepperville, a small town near the Croissant City, situated in a place reminiscent of Louisiana, is very interesting and causes the book to have a whimsical atmosphere. The zombie, Claudette, was amusing. Also, overall, the book was really funny and had good illustrations. The writing was okay: neither good nor bad, and there were too many semicolons in my opinion. But this is an engaging book to read for fun, and it has humor in it, though not much action
    About 1 month ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants added a book review.
    In this imaginative tale set in a world resplendent with French food, swamps, and alligators, August DuPont endeavors to become a part of society. Up till now, he has been admonished by Aunt Hydrangea to stay inside, lest he be attacked by butterflies. But never could he have imagined that he would be introduced to three humans, all of his own age, while attempting to get Mud Pies. Never could he have thought that, on the next day, he would be introduced to another human, his aunt Orchid Malveu, who instructs him to find a valuable family heirloom. It is still surprising, though, when he discovers that he has summoned a zombie named Claudette from the grave. As August tries to befriend his rich cousins, all while keeping his zombie hidden, he discovers the history of the DuPont and Malveu families: specifically, their bitter rivalry over stolen hot sauce recipes, and he finds out the existence of an ancestor who practiced necromancy using the Zombie Stone, the expensive family heirloom Orchid wishes to locate. What I liked about this book about problems with zombies was its world-building. The imaginative setting where the story takes place, namely, Pepperville, a small town near the Croissant City, situated in a place reminiscent of Louisiana, is very interesting and causes the book to have a whimsical atmosphere. The zombie, Claudette, was amusing. Also, overall, the book was really funny and had good illustrations. The writing was okay: neither good nor bad, and there were too many semicolons in my opinion. But this is an engaging book to read for fun, and it has humor in it, though not much action
    About 1 month ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants has read this book.
    About 1 month ago

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First BookCreate an AvatarWrote First Book ReviewWrote 10 Book ReviewsJoined National Geographic Kids Book Club

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