From the bestselling author of HISTORY IS ALL YOU LEFT ME comes another unforgettable story of life, loss and making each day count On September 5th, a little after midnight, Death-Cast calls Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio to give them some bad news: they're going to die today. Mateo and Rufus are total strangers, but, for different reasons, they're both looking to make a new friend on their End Day. The good news: there's an app for that. It's called the Last Friend, and through it, Rufus and Mateo are about to meet up for one last great adventure - to live a lifetime in a single day. Another beautiful, heartbreaking and life-affirming book from the brilliant Adam Silvera, author of History Is All You Left Me (a Zoella Book Club 2017 novel) PRAISE FOR ADAM SILVERA: 'History Is All You Left Me overflows with tenderness and heartache. Even when its hero is screwing up royally, maybe especially then, Silvera's humanity and compassion carve out a space where it's not the falling that's important, it's how you pick yourself back up. There isn't a teenager alive who won't find their heart described perfectly on these pages.' Patrick Ness 'Adam Silvera is a master at capturing the infinite small heartbreaks of love and loss and grief. History Is All You Left Me is a beautiful meditation on what it means to survive devastating loss. This book will make you cry, think, and then cry some more.' Nicola Yoon 'Bold and haunting.' Lauren Oliver on They Both Die At The End 'A phenomenal talent.' Juno Dawson
Paperback, 384 pages
Published on September 7, 2017 by Simon & Schuster Childrens Books
ISBN-10: 1471166201
ISBN-13: 9781471166204
1 Book Review
  • lemonade11
    lemonade11over 1 year55 stars
    This book is definitely a compelling read. In a world where one knows they are going to die in 24 hours, one can live out their last hours by using resources given to those on their End Day. Two friends; Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio meet through the app the Last Friend and spend the day together meeting up at first as complete strangers. Although you know they are both going to die at the end, Silvera writes in such a way that makes you think Mateo and Rufus might just be the exception. It has a doleful tone at times and crying might ensue if read.